Major and Minor in Classical Studies

To declare a major or minor, a student need only fill out a short form available from Sara Nobbe, the undergraduate advisor for the School of Literatures, Cultural Studies and Linguistics (see link to Advising below). Students should e-mail Ms. Nobbe (senobbe@uic.edu) to set up a short appointment. If a student has already declared another major and wishes to switch to Classics, or to add Classics as a second major, this same form should be completed.

NEW DECLARATION OF MAJOR AND MINOR

Students desiring to declare a major (or minor) in Classics can do so by selecting "Classical Studies." All readings in Greek and Latin authors for the "Classical Studies" major and minor are in English translation, except that the major requires students to demonstrate a reading proficiency at the intermediate level in either Ancient Greek or Modern Greek or Latin. This requirement can be satisfied either by earning a passing grade in GKA 104 or GKM 104 or LAT 104, or by means of a proficiency examination. The fulfillment of this requirement simultaneously satisfies the LAS foreign-language requirement. In addition, students majoring in Classical Studies who want to take courses in Ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond the required 104-level can complete a course of advanced study formerly available through the suspended Greek (or Latin) major by pursuing the new and expanded honors track leading to high or highest distinction. Details of the requirements and options for the major or the minor can be found in the Advising section.

NATURE OF THE PROGRAM

Courses offered by the department have as their focus the civilizations of Ancient Greece and Rome, as well as the Ancient Near East, ancient Egypt, the Arabic world, and modern Greece—their languages, literatures, histories, philosophies, religions, arts, and archaeology. Study in our program is inherently interdisciplinary and can touch upon many subjects, ranging from drama to astronomy, from mythology to geography, from science to gender studies, from philology to literary criticism, from political theory to sociology and anthropology—a complete liberal arts education in a single department.