Events

"Crossing the Adriatic: Christians and Jews between Italy and Greece"  Add To Calendar

  • Date(s): Friday, 4/21 4:00 PM to Friday, 4/21 6:00 PM
  • Address: UIC Institute for the Humanities 701 S Morgan St, Chicago, IL 60607
  • Location: Chicago, Illinois
Two papers explore the fascinating but long-neglected connections between Italy and Greece during the tumultuous nineteenth century. In the early 1800s, Mario Pieri, an Ionian intellectual and resident of Florence, became a Greek exile by not moving at all as he gradually discovered his new national home across the Adriatic Sea, Greece. In the late 1800s, the Jewish merchants of Corfu established a philanthropic network spanning from Trieste to Alexandria turning the Adriatic Sea into a Jewish space and Corfu into a diasporic identity. Mobility across the Adriatic Sea fostered new belongings that both sustained and transcended the nation.
 
Dr. Konstantina Zanou (Columbia University), “Becoming an exile: Mario Pieri and the Greek Revolution from the Italian Shores”

Constanze Kolbe (Indiana University, Bloomington, “A Jewish Odyssey: Transnational Philanthropy and the Limits of Jewish Solidarity in fin-de-siècle Adriatic


Discussant: Dr. Dean Kostantaras (University of Illinois at Chicago)
 
Light refreshments will be offered. The event is free and open to the public.

Two papers explore the fascinating but long-neglected connections between Italy and Greece during the tumultuous nineteenth century. In the early 1800s, Mario Pieri, an Ionian intellectual and resident of Florence, became a Greek exile by not moving at all as he gradually discovered his new national home across the Adriatic Sea, Greece. In the late 1800s, the Jewish merchants of Corfu established a philanthropic network spanning from Trieste to Alexandria turning the Adriatic Sea into a Jewish space and Corfu into a diasporic identity. Mobility across the Adriatic Sea fostered new belongings that both sustained and transcended the nation.
 
Two papers explore the fascinating but long-neglected connections between Italy and Greece during the tumultuous nineteenth century. In the early 1800s, Mario Pieri, an Ionian intellectual and resident of Florence, became a Greek exile by not moving at all as he gradually discovered his new national home across the Adriatic Sea, Greece. In the late 1800s, the Jewish merchants of Corfu established a philanthropic network spanning from Trieste to Alexandria turning the Adriatic Sea into a Jewish space and Corfu into a diasporic identity. Mobility across the Adriatic Sea fostered new belongings that both sustained and transcended the nation.
 
Two papers explore the fascinating but long-neglected connections between Italy and Greece during the tumultuous nineteenth century. In the early 1800s, Mario Pieri, an Ionian intellectual and resident of Florence, became a Greek exile by not moving at all as he gradually discovered his new national home across the Adriatic Sea, Greece. In the late 1800s, the Jewish merchants of Corfu established a philanthropic network spanning from Trieste to Alexandria turning the Adriatic Sea into a Jewish space and Corfu into a diasporic identity. Mobility across the Adriatic Sea fostered new belongings that both sustained and transcended the nation.
 
Two papers explore the fascinating but long-neglected connections between Italy and Greece during the tumultuous nineteenth century. In the early 1800s, Mario Pieri, an Ionian intellectual and resident of Florence, became a Greek exile by not moving at all as he gradually discovered his new national home across the Adriatic Sea, Greece. In the late 1800s, the Jewish merchants of Corfu established a philanthropic network spanning from Trieste to Alexandria turning the Adriatic Sea into a Jewish space and Corfu into a diasporic identity. Mobility across the Adriatic Sea fostered new belongings that both sustained and transcended the nation.